Bulgogi, or Korean BBQ


We needed a dinner Plan b one night last week so I told my hubby I would check in the freezer for a “simple meal.” What do you know, we had 2 lbs. of cut-up London Broil, ready for Korean bulgogi so I thawed it in the microwave.

The success of this recipe lies in the meat being properly cut by the butcher. Personally, I like a good marbled cut of beef chuck roast or a fatty pork roast. It doesn’t sound so healthy, but fat makes the meat more tender and flavorful.

As for the cut, I usually tell my butcher, “Cut it like wafer-thin bacon, and then cut it into two-inch pieces.” Each butcher interprets my instructions slightly differently, so it’s always an adventure. They can’t botch it too bad, I have decided.

The meat would have been more flavorful marinated longer but for a last- minute 2 hour prep it turned out pretty good. Ideally, marinate the meat overnight. Also, starting out with thawed meat is definitely better.

I also ended up making jap chae noodles. And used the little metal rice bowls I got for Mother’s day. “Simple meal” lol. (For a fancy meal it was actually fairly easy.)

Here was a fun part. Last summer my hubby had to get a butane stove when our camping grill quit working. The kind that goes with a grill pan expressly for bulgogi. I used it for the first time with this meal and it was nice to cook at the deck picnic table without having to deal with electric griddle chords.

Print Recipe
Bulgogi (Korean BBQ)
Prep Time 2-24 hours
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 2-24 hours
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Put all ingredients except meat in a ziploc bag.
  2. Slosh marinade around carefully to mix well and then add the meat in, making sure all of the meat slices are coated and not clumping. Sealing the bag, massage the meat into the marinade. The more you mix the better it will taste. Marinate in fridge overnight (ideal) or at least 2 hours.
  3. Stir-fry in hot oil in frying pan, electric griddle, or in pan over butane stove.
  4. Wrap the meat with rice and kimchi in lettuce leaf and enjoy.
Recipe Notes

The success of this recipe lies in the meat being properly cut by the butcher. Personally, I like a good marbled cut of beef chuck roast or a fatty pork roast. It doesn't sound so healthy, but fat makes the meat more tender and flavorful. As for the cut, I usually tell my butcher, "Cut it like wafer-thin bacon, and then cut it into two-inch pieces."

For the cookware, I love using our  electric raclette (the flat side) or our butane stove right at the dinner table. If you have neither, you can stir-fry it in a frying pan over the stove. 

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